4 Tactics for Hiring the Right Candidate

Hiring the right candidate for a job can sometimes seem like wandering through a dense forest with a blindfold over your face when you have too many applicants. After a while, they all start to seem the same if you do lots of interviews in one day, which is an inefficient use of your time. You might like a candidate’s ideas, but they lack qualifications. The opposite could also happen, where the qualifications are a perfect match for the job, but the candidates seems to lack creativity. Whatever the situation is, it can make the hiring process easier to keep four basic tactics in mind for finding the right person for the job.

List the Position on the Right Job Sites

Start out with a good crop of people and list the position on the right websites
Start out with a good crop of people and list the position on the right websites
Start out with a good crop of people and list the position on the right websites. If you’re in a narrow field, definitely identify the job listing sites that focus on the profession and see what kind of response you get. Don’t expand into broader, more general sites until you’ve exhausted the possibilities and resumes you receive from the industry-specific job sites. You should also be very clear about what the job requires and don’t leave anything ambiguous, unless it really is. For example, if you’re really not going to hire someone with less than a college degree, include that in the listing. Don’t let candidates waste their time and yours by submitting a resume when they only have a high school degree. Candidates that hail from a job site focusing on the specific profession you’re hiring for, rather than a more general employment listing site, will be more likely to present a possible fit for the position.

Think Outside Scholastic Qualifications

Traditionally, candidates with the highest level of education completed were the most desirable, but that isn’t the case anymore. In age of excessive student loan debt and difficult in finding employment after being enrolled in a full-time schedule of study, many people in the workforce didn’t bother continuing their education. This goes for even academic positions that usually would require a Master’s degree or higher. For that reason, you should think outside the box of scholastic qualifications. Just because someone only has a Bachelor’s degree, but has years of experience, doesn’t mean that they’re not a match for the candidate fresh out of graduate school with no work experience. These days, education is no longer the number one indicator of being qualified for a job.


Consult Professional Networking Sites

Employers are using professional networking sites like LinkedIn more and more these days. Ranging from reviewing other professionals’ endorsements on the site to actually listing open positions, these sites are becoming very popular. Social media plays an essential role in how people communicate in today’s world, and professional network is just another facet of these trends. The downside to sites like LinkedIn is that you’re literally shopping through candidates who you don’t know. The upside, however, is that you have thousands of qualified people at your fingertips. Usually, professional networking sites also allow users to specify whether they’re looking for new employment opportunities, so that’s a good way to filter whose profile you’re reviewing. Much like Facebook suggests friends for you because more than one of your existing friends know them, professional networking sites will give you two or three degrees of separation and let you know if the profile you’re looking at has any connection to you already. If you find a person you like, it’s an added attribute if they also have a connection to someone you already know and respect.

Get Recommendations from Colleagues

Get Recommendations from Colleagues
Get Recommendations from Colleagues
If you don’t want to depend on submissions from cold candidates finding your job listing on an employment site, you can also ask other professionals for referrals. There’s always an association for every profession imaginable, and this is where you should start. Whether you’re looking to hire an administrative assistant or an adjunct professor, you can’t go wrong by asking your colleagues. Usually, professional associations have mailing lists or message boards on their official site. This is where you want to go to request assistance in finding a good candidate to fill a open job position. Most other professionals in your field have probably gone through some step of the hiring process, whether being interviewers themselves or just reviewing resumes. Word of mouth is often more reliable than blindly reviewing resumes.